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Agaric Collective: Migrating JSON files into Drupal

Sun, 08/18/2019 - 15:34

Today we will learn how to migrate content from a JSON file into Drupal using the Migrate Plus module. We will show how to configure the migration to read files from the local file system and remote locations. The example includes node, images, and paragraphs migrations. Let’s get started.

Note: Migrate Plus has many more features. For example, it contains source plugins to import from XML files and SOAP endpoints. It provides many useful process plugins for DOM manipulation, string replacement, transliteration, etc. The module also lets you define migration plugins as configurations and create groups to share settings. It offers a custom event to modify the source data before processing begins. In today’s blog post, we are focusing on importing JSON files. Other features will be covered in future entries.

Getting the code

You can get the full code example at https://github.com/dinarcon/ud_migrations The module to enable is UD JSON source migration whose machine name is ud_migrations_json_source. It comes with four migrations: udm_json_source_paragraph, udm_json_source_image, udm_json_source_node_local, and udm_json_source_node_remote.

You can get the Migrate Plus module using composer: composer require 'drupal/migrate_plus:^5.0'. This will install the 8.x-5.x branch where new development will happen. This branch was created to introduce breaking changes in preparation for Drupal 9. As of this writing, the 8.x-4.x branch has feature parity with the newer branch. If your Drupal site is not composer-based, you can download the module manually.

Understanding the example set up

This migration will reuse the same configuration from the introduction to paragraph migrations example. Refer to that article for details on the configuration: the destinations will be the same content type, paragraph type, and fields. The source will be changed in today's example, as we use it to explain JSON migrations. The end result will again be nodes containing an image and a paragraph with information about someone’s favorite book. The major difference is that we are going to read from JSON. In fact, three of the migrations will read from the same file. The following snippet shows a reduced version of the file to get a sense of its structure:

{ "data": { "udm_people": [ { "unique_id": 1, "name": "Michele Metts", "photo_file": "P01", "book_ref": "B10" }, {...}, {...} ], "udm_book_paragraph": [ { "book_id": "B10", "book_details": { "title": "The definite guide to Drupal 7", "author": "Benjamin Melançon et al." } }, {...}, {...} ], "udm_photos": [ { "photo_id": "P01", "photo_url": "https://agaric.coop/sites/default/files/pictures/picture-15-1421176712.jpg", "photo_dimensions": [240, 351] }, {...}, {...} ] } }

Note: You can literally swap migration sources without changing any other part of the migration.  This is a powerful feature of ETL frameworks like Drupal’s Migrate API. Although possible, the example includes slight changes to demonstrate various plugin configuration options. Also, some machine names had to be changed to avoid conflicts with other examples in the demo repository.

Migrating nodes from a JSON file

In any migration project, understanding the source is very important. For JSON migrations, there are two major considerations. First, where in the file hierarchy lies the data that you want to import. It can be at the root of the file or several levels deep in the hierarchy. Second, when you get to the array of records that you want to import, what fields are going to be made available to the migration. It is possible that each record contains more data than needed. For improved performance, it is recommended to manually include only the fields that will be required for the migration. The following code snippet shows part of the local JSON file relevant to the node migration:

{ "data": { "udm_people": [ { "unique_id": 1, "name": "Michele Metts", "photo_file": "P01", "book_ref": "B10" }, {...}, {...} ] } }

The array of records containing node data lies two levels deep in the hierarchy. Starting with data at the root and then descending one level to udm_people. Each element of this array is an object with four properties:

  • unique_id is the unique identifier for each record within the data/udm_people hierarchy.
  • name is the name of a person. This will be used in the node title.
  • photo_file is the unique identifier of an image that was created in a separate migration.
  • book_ref is the unique identifier of a book paragraph that was created in a separate migration.

The following snippet shows the configuration to read a local JSON file for the node migration:

source: plugin: url data_fetcher_plugin: file data_parser_plugin: json urls: - modules/custom/ud_migrations/ud_migrations_json_source/sources/udm_data.json item_selector: data/udm_people fields: - name: src_unique_id label: 'Unique ID' selector: unique_id - name: src_name label: 'Name' selector: name - name: src_photo_file label: 'Photo ID' selector: photo_file - name: src_book_ref label: 'Book paragraph ID' selector: book_ref ids: src_unique_id: type: integer

The name of the plugin is url. Because we are reading a local file, the data_fetcher_plugin  is set to file and the data_parser_plugin to json. The urls configuration contains an array of file paths relative to the Drupal root. In the example, we are reading from one file only, but you can read from multiple files at once. In that case, it is important that they have a homogeneous structure. The settings that follow will apply equally to all the files listed in urls.

The item_selector configuration indicates where in the JSON file lies the array of records to be migrated. Its value is an XPath-like string used to traverse the file hierarchy. In this case, the value is data/udm_people. Note that you separate each level in the hierarchy with a slash (/).

fields has to be set to an array. Each element represents a field that will be made available to the migration. The following options can be set:

  • name is required. This is how the field is going to be referenced in the migration. The name itself can be arbitrary. If it contained spaces, you need to put double quotation marks (") around it when referring to it in the migration.
  • label is optional. This is a description used when presenting details about the migration. For example, in the user interface provided by the Migrate Tools module. When defined, you do not use the label to refer to the field. Keep using the name.
  • selector is required. This is another XPath-like string to find the field to import. The value must be relative to the location specified by the item_selector configuration. In the example, the fields are direct children of the records to migrate. Therefore, only the property name is specified (e.g., unique_id). If you had nested objects or arrays, you would use a slash (/) character to go deeper in the hierarchy. This will be demonstrated in the image and paragraph migrations.

Finally, you specify an ids array of field names that would uniquely identify each record. As already stated, the unique_id field servers that purpose. The following snippet shows part of the process, destination, and dependencies configuration of the node migration:

process: field_ud_image/target_id: plugin: migration_lookup migration: udm_json_source_image source: src_photo_file destination: plugin: 'entity:node' default_bundle: ud_paragraphs migration_dependencies: required: - udm_json_source_image - udm_json_source_paragraph optional: []

The source for the setting the image reference is src_photo_file. Again, this is the name of the field, not the label nor selector. The configuration of the migration lookup plugin and dependencies point to two JSON migrations that come with this example. One is for migrating images and the other for migrating paragraphs.

Migrating paragraphs from a JSON file

Let’s consider an example where the records to migrate have many levels of nesting. The following snippets show part of the local JSON file and source plugin configuration for the paragraph migration:

{ "data": { "udm_book_paragraph": [ { "book_id": "B10", "book_details": { "title": "The definite guide to Drupal 7", "author": "Benjamin Melançon et al." } }, {...}, {...} ] } source: plugin: url data_fetcher_plugin: file data_parser_plugin: json urls: - modules/custom/ud_migrations/ud_migrations_json_source/sources/udm_data.json item_selector: data/udm_book_paragraph fields: - name: src_book_id label: 'Book ID' selector: book_id - name: src_book_title label: 'Title' selector: book_details/title - name: src_book_author label: 'Author' selector: book_details/author ids: src_book_id: type: string

The plugin, data_fetcher_plugin, data_parser_plugin and urls configurations have the same values as in the node migration. The item_selector and ids configurations are slightly different to represent the path to paragraph records and the unique identifier field, respectively.

The interesting part is the value of the fields configuration. Taking data/udm_book_paragraph as a starting point, the records with paragraph data have a nested structure. Notice that book_details is an object with two properties: title and author. To refer to them, the selectors are book_details/title and book_details/author, respectively. Note that you can go as many level deeps in the hierarchy to find the value that should be assigned to the field. Every level in the hierarchy would be separated by a slash (/).

In this example, the target is a single paragraph type. But a similar technique can be used to migrate multiple types. One way to configure the JSON file is to have two properties. paragraph_id would contain the unique identifier for the record. paragraph_data would be an object with a property to set the paragraph type. This would also have an arbitrary number of extra properties with the data to be migrated. In the process section, you would iterate over the records to map the paragraph fields.

The following snippet shows part of the process configuration of the paragraph migration:

process: field_ud_book_paragraph_title: src_book_title field_ud_book_paragraph_author: src_book_authorMigrating images from a JSON file

Let’s consider an example where the records to migrate have more data than needed. The following snippets show part of the local JSON file and source plugin configuration for the image migration:

{ "data": { "udm_photos": [ { "photo_id": "P01", "photo_url": "https://agaric.coop/sites/default/files/pictures/picture-15-1421176712.jpg", "photo_dimensions": [240, 351] }, {...}, {...} ] } } source: plugin: url data_fetcher_plugin: file data_parser_plugin: json urls: - modules/custom/ud_migrations/ud_migrations_json_source/sources/udm_data.json item_selector: data/udm_photos fields: - name: src_photo_id label: 'Photo ID' selector: photo_id - name: src_photo_url label: 'Photo URL' selector: photo_url ids: src_photo_id: type: string

The plugin, data_fetcher_plugin, data_parser_plugin and urls configurations have the same values as in the node migration. The item_selector and ids configurations are slightly different to represent the path to image records and the unique identifier field, respectively.

The interesting part is the value of the fields configuration. Taking data/udm_photos as a starting point, the records with image data have extra properties that are not used in the migration. Particularly, the photo_dimensions property contains an array with two values representing the width and height of the image, respectively. To ignore this property, you simply omit it from the fields configuration. In case you wanted to use it, the selectors would be photo_dimensions/0 for the width and photo_dimensions/1 for the height. Note that you use a zero-based numerical index to get the values out of arrays. Like with objects, a slash (/) is used to separate each level in the hierarchy. You can go as far as necessary in the hierarchy.

The following snippet shows part of the process configuration of the image migration:

process: psf_destination_filename: plugin: callback callable: basename source: src_photo_urlJSON file location

When using the file data fetcher plugin, you have three options to indicate the location to the JSON files in the urls configuration:

  • Use a relative path from the Drupal root. The path should not start with a slash (/). This is the approach used in this demo. For example, modules/custom/my_module/json_files/example.json.
  • Use an absolute path pointing to the CSV location in the file system. The path should start with a slash (/). For example, /var/www/drupal/modules/custom/my_module/json_files/example.json.
  • Use a stream wrapper.

Being able to use stream wrappers gives you many more options. For instance:

  • Files located in the public, private, and temporary file systems managed by Drupal. This leverages functionality already available in Drupal core. For example: public://json_files/example.json.
  • Files located in profiles, modules, and themes. You can use the System stream wrapper module or apply this core patch to get this functionality. For example, module://my_module/json_files/example.json.
  • Files located in remote servers including RSS feeds. You can use the Remote stream wrapper module to get this functionality. For example, https://understanddrupal.com/json-files/example.json.
Migrating remote JSON files

Migrate Plus provides another data fetcher plugin named http. You can use it to fetch files using the http and https protocols. Under the hood, it uses the Guzzle HTTP Client library. In a future blog post we will explain this data fetcher in more detail. For now, the udm_json_source_node_remote migration demonstrates a basic setup for this plugin. Note that only the data_fetcher_plugin and urls configurations are different from the local file example. The following snippet shows part of the configuration to read a remote JSON file for the node migration:

source: plugin: url data_fetcher_plugin: http data_parser_plugin: json urls: - https://api.myjson.com/bins/110rcr item_selector: data/udm_people fields: ... ids: ...

And that is how you can use JSON files as the source of your migrations. Many more configurations are possible. For example, you can provide authentication information to get access to protected resources. You can also set custom HTTP headers. Examples will be presented in a future entry.

What did you learn in today’s blog post? Have you migrated from JSON files before? If so, what challenges have you found? Did you know that you can read local and remote files? Please share your answers in the comments. Also, I would be grateful if you shared this blog post with others.

This blog post series, cross-posted at UnderstandDrupal.com as well as here on Agaric.coop, is made possible thanks to these generous sponsors: Drupalize.me by Osio Labs has online tutorials about migrations, among other topics, and Agaric provides migration trainings, among other services.  Contact Understand Drupal if your organization would like to support this documentation project, whether it is the migration series or other topics.

Read more and discuss at agaric.coop.

Agaric Collective: Migrating CSV files into Drupal

Sat, 08/17/2019 - 21:38

Today we will learn how to migrate content from a Comma-Separated Values (CSV) file into Drupal. We are going to use the latest version of the Migrate Source CSV module which depends on the third-party library league/csv. We will show how configure the source plugin to read files with or without a header row. We will also talk about a new feature that allows you to use stream wrappers to set the file location. Let’s get started.

Getting the code

You can get the full code example at https://github.com/dinarcon/ud_migrations The module to enable is UD CSV source migration whose machine name is ud_migrations_csv_source. It comes with three migrations: udm_csv_source_paragraph, udm_csv_source_image, and udm_csv_source_node.

You can get the Migrate Source CSV module is using composer: composer require drupal/migrate_source_csv. This will also download its dependency: the league/csv library. The example assumes you are using 8.x-3.x branch of the module, which requires composer to be installed. If your Drupal site is not composer-based, you can use the 8.x-2.x branch. Continue reading to learn the difference between the two branches.

Understanding the example set up

This migration will reuse the same configuration from the introduction to paragraph migrations example. Refer to that article for details on the configuration: the destinations will be the same content type, paragraph type, and fields. The source will be changed in today's example, as we use it to explain JSON migration. The end result will again be nodes containing an image and a paragraph with information about someone’s favorite book. The major difference is that we are going to read from JSON.

Note that you can literally swap migration sources without changing any other part of the migration. This is a powerful feature of ETL frameworks like Drupal’s Migrate API. Although possible, the example includes slight changes to demonstrate various plugin configuration options. Also, some machine names had to be changed to avoid conflicts with other examples in the demo repository.

Migrating CSV files with a header row

In any migration project, understanding the source is very important. For CSV migrations, the primary thing to consider is whether or not the file contains a row of headers. Other things to consider are what characters to use as delimiter, enclosure, and escape character. For now, let’s consider the following CSV file whose first row serves as column headers:

unique_id,name,photo_file,book_ref 1,Michele Metts,P01,B10 2,Benjamin Melançon,P02,B20 3,Stefan Freudenberg,P03,B30

This file will be used in the node migration. The four columns are used as follows:

  • unique_id is the unique identifier for each record in this CSV file.
  • name is the name of a person. This will be used as the node title.
  • photo_file is the unique identifier of an image that was created in a separate migration.
  • book_ref is the unique identifier of a book paragraph that was created in a separate migration.

The following snippet shows the configuration of the CSV source plugin for the node migration:

source: plugin: csv path: modules/custom/ud_migrations/ud_migrations_csv_source/sources/udm_people.csv ids: [unique_id]

The name of the plugin is csv. Then you define the path pointing to the file itself. In this case, the path is relative to the Drupal root. Finally, you specify an ids array of columns names that would uniquely identify each record. As already stated, the unique_id column servers that purpose. Note that there is no need to specify all the columns names from the CSV file. The plugin will automatically make them available. That is the simplest configuration of the CSV source plugin.

The following snippet shows part of the process, destination, and dependencies configuration of the node migration:

process: field_ud_image/target_id: plugin: migration_lookup migration: udm_csv_source_image source: photo_file destination: plugin: 'entity:node' default_bundle: ud_paragraphs migration_dependencies: required: - udm_csv_source_image - udm_csv_source_paragraph optional: []

Note that the source for the setting the image reference is photo_file. In the process pipeline you can directly use any column name that exists in the CSV file. The configuration of the migration lookup plugin and dependencies point to two CSV migrations that come with this example. One is for migrating images and the other for migrating paragraphs.

Migrating CSV files without a header row

Now let’s consider two examples of CSV files that do not have a header row. The following snippets show the example CSV file and source plugin configuration for the paragraph migration:

B10,The definite guide to Drupal 7,Benjamin Melançon et al. B20,Understanding Drupal Views,Carlos Dinarte B30,Understanding Drupal Migrations,Mauricio Dinarte source: plugin: csv path: modules/custom/ud_migrations/ud_migrations_csv_source/sources/udm_book_paragraph.csv ids: [book_id] header_offset: null fields: - name: book_id - name: book_title - name: 'Book author'

When you do not have a header row, you need to specify two more configuration options. header_offset has to be set to null. fields has to be set to an array where each element represents a column in the CSV file. You include a name for each column following the order in which they appear in the file. The name itself can be arbitrary. If it contained spaces, you need to put quotes (') around it. After that, you set the ids configuration to one or more columns using the names you defined.

In the process section you refer to source columns as usual. You write their name adding quotes if it contained spaces. The following snippet shows how the process section is configured for the paragraph migration:

process: field_ud_book_paragraph_title: book_title field_ud_book_paragraph_author: 'Book author'

The final example will show a slight variation of the previous configuration. The following two snippets show the example CSV file and source plugin configuration for the image migration:

P01,https://agaric.coop/sites/default/files/pictures/picture-15-1421176712.jpg P02,https://agaric.coop/sites/default/files/pictures/picture-3-1421176784.jpg P03,https://agaric.coop/sites/default/files/pictures/picture-2-1421176752.jpg source: plugin: csv path: modules/custom/ud_migrations/ud_migrations_csv_source/sources/udm_photos.csv ids: [photo_id] header_offset: null fields: - name: photo_id label: 'Photo ID' - name: photo_url label: 'Photo URL'

For each column defined in the fields configuration, you can optionally set a label. This is a description used when presenting details about the migration. For example, in the user interface provided by the Migrate Tools module. When defined, you do not use the label to refer to source columns. You keep using the column name. You can see this in the value of the ids configuration.

The following snippet shows part of the process configuration of the image migration:

process: psf_destination_filename: plugin: callback callable: basename source: photo_url CSV file location

When setting the path configuration you have three options to indicate the CSV file location:

  • Use a relative path from the Drupal root. The path should not start with a slash (/). This is the approach used in this demo. For example, modules/custom/my_module/csv_files/example.csv.
  • Use an absolute path pointing to the CSV location in the file system. The path should start with a slash (/). For example, /var/www/drupal/modules/custom/my_module/csv_files/example.csv.
  • Use a stream wrapper. This feature was introduced in the 8.x-3.x branch of the module. Previous versions cannot make use of them.

Being able to use stream wrappers gives you many options for setting the location to the CSV file. For instance:

  • Files located in the public, private, and temporary file systems managed by Drupal. This leverages functionality already available in Drupal core. For example: public://csv_files/example.csv.
  • Files located in profiles, modules, and themes. You can use the System stream wrapper module or apply this core patch to get this functionality. For example, module://my_module/csv_files/example.csv.
  • Files located in remote servers including RSS feeds. You can use the Remote stream wrapper module to get this functionality. For example, https://understanddrupal.com/csv-files/example.csv.
CSV source plugin configuration

The configuration options for the CSV source plugin are very well documented in the source code. They are included here for quick reference:

  • path is required. It contains the path to the CSV file. Starting with the 8.x-3.x branch, stream wrappers are supported.
  • ids is required. It contains an array of column names that uniquely identify each record.
  • header_offset is optional. The index of record to be used as the CSV header and the thereby each record's field name. It defaults to zero (0) because the index is zero-based. For CSV files with no header row the value should be set to null.
  • fields is optional. It contains a nested array of names and labels to use instead of a header row. If set, it will overwrite the column names obtained from header_offset.
  • delimiter is optional. It contains one character column delimiter. It defaults to a comma (,). For example, if your file uses tabs as delimiter, you set this configuration to \t.
  • enclosure is optional. It contains one character used to enclose the column values. Defaults to double quotation marks (").
  • escape is optional. It contains one character used for character escaping in the column values. It defaults to a backslash (****).

Important: The configuration options changed significantly between the 8.x-3.x and 8.x-2.x branches. Refer to this change record for a reference of how to configure the plugin for the 8.x-2.x.

And that is how you can use CSV files as the source of your migrations. Because this is such a common need, it was considered to move the CSV source plugin to Drupal core. The effort is currently on hold and it is unclear if it will materialize during Drupal 8’s lifecycle. The maintainers of the Migrate API are focusing their efforts on other priorities at the moment. You can read this issue to learn about the motivation and context for offering functionality in Drupal core.

Note: The Migrate Spreadsheet module can also be used to migrate data from CSV files. It also supports Microsoft Office Excel and LibreOffice Calc (OpenDocument) files. The module leverages the PhpOffice/PhpSpreadsheet library.

What did you learn in today’s blog post? Have you migrated from CSV files before? Did you know that it is now possible to read files using stream wrappers? Please share your answers in the comments. Also, I would be grateful if you shared this blog post with others.

This blog post series, cross-posted at UnderstandDrupal.com as well as here on Agaric.coop, is made possible thanks to these generous sponsors: Drupalize.me by Osio Labs has online tutorials about migrations, among other topics, and Agaric provides migration trainings, among other services. Contact Understand Drupal if your organization would like to support this documentation project, whether it is the migration series or other topics.

Read more and discuss at agaric.coop.

Spinning Code: SC DUG August 2019

Fri, 08/16/2019 - 13:00

After a couple months off, SC DUG met this month with a presentation on super cheap Drupal hosting.

Chris Zietlow from Mindgrub, Will Jackson from Kanopi Studios, and I all gave short talks very cheap ways to host Drupal 8.

Chris opened by talking about using AWS Micro servers. Will shared a solution using a Raspberry Pi for a fully wireless server. I closed the discussion with a review of using Drupal Tome on Netlify.

We all worked from a loose set of rules to help keep us honest and prevent overlapping:

Rules for Cheap D8 Hosting Challenge

The goal is to figure out the cheapest D8 hosting that would actually function for a project, even if it is deeply irresponsible to actually use.

Rules
  1. It has to actually work for D8 (so modern PHP version, working database, etc),
  2. You do not actually have to spend the money, but you do need to know all the steps required to make it work.
  3. It needs to honor the TOS for any networks and services you use (no illegal network taps – legal hidden taps are fair game).
  4. You have to share your idea with the other players so we don’t have two people propose the same solution (first-come-first-serve on ideas).
Reporting

Be prepared to talk for about 5 minutes on how your solution would work.  Your talk needs to include:

  1. Estimated Monthly cost for the first year.
  2. Steps required to make it work.
  3. Known weaknesses.

If you have a super cheap hosting solution for Drupal 8 we’d love to hear about it.

Agaric Collective: Introduction to paragraphs migrations in Drupal

Thu, 08/15/2019 - 23:52

Today we will present an introduction to paragraphs migrations in Drupal. The example consists of migrating paragraphs of one type, then connecting the migrated paragraphs to nodes. A separate image migration is included to demonstrate how they are different. At the end, we will talk about behavior that deletes paragraphs when the host entity is deleted. Let’s get started.

Getting the code

You can get the full code example at https://github.com/dinarcon/ud_migrations The module to enable is UD paragraphs migration introduction whose machine name is ud_migrations_paragraph_intro. It comes with three migrations: ud_migrations_paragraph_intro_paragraph, ud_migrations_paragraph_intro_image, and ud_migrations_paragraph_intro_node. One content type, one paragraph type, and four fields will be created when the module is installed.

Note: Configuration placed in a module’s config/install directory will be copied to Drupal’s active configuration. And if those files have a dependencies/enforced/module key, the configuration will be removed when the listed modules are uninstalled. That is how the content type, the paragraph type, and the fields are automatically created and deleted.

You can get the Paragraph module is using composer: composer require drupal/paragraphs. This will also download its dependency: the Entity Reference Revisions module. If your Drupal site is not composer-based, you can get the code for both modules manually.

Understanding the example set up

The example code creates one paragraph type named UD book paragraph (ud_book_paragraph). It has two “Text (plain)” fields: Title (field_ud_book_paragraph_title) and Author (field_ud_book_paragraph_author). A new UD Paragraphs (ud_paragraphs) content type is also created. This has two fields: Image (field_ud_image) and Favorite book (field_ud_favorite_book) containing references to images and book paragraphs imported in separate migrations. The words in parenthesis represent the machine names of the different elements.

The paragraph migration

Migrating into a paragraph type is very similar to migrating into a content type. You specify the source, process the fields making any required transformation, and set the destination entity and bundle. The following code snippet shows the source, process, and destination sections:

source: plugin: embedded_data data_rows: - book_id: 'B10' book_title: 'The definite guide to Drupal 7' book_author: 'Benjamin Melançon et al.' - book_id: 'B20' book_title: 'Understanding Drupal Views' book_author: 'Carlos Dinarte' - book_id: 'B30' book_title: 'Understanding Drupal Migrations' book_author: 'Mauricio Dinarte' ids: book_id: type: string process: field_ud_book_paragraph_title: book_title field_ud_book_paragraph_author: book_author destination: plugin: 'entity_reference_revisions:paragraph' default_bundle: ud_book_paragraph

The most important part of a paragraph migration is setting the destination plugin to entity_reference_revisions:paragraph. This plugin is actually provided by the Entity Reference Revisions module. It is very important to note that paragraphs entities are revisioned. This means that when you want to create a reference to them, you need to provide two IDs: target_id and target_revision_id. Regular entity reference fields like files, images, and taxonomy terms only require the target_id. This will be further explained with the node migration.

The other configuration that you can optionally set in the destination section is default_bundle. The value will be the machine name of the paragraph type you are migrating into. You can do this when all the paragraphs for a particular migration definition file will be of the same type. If that is not the case, you can leave out the default_bundle configuration and add a mapping for the type entity property in the process section.

You can execute the paragraph migration with this command: drush migrate:import
ud_migrations_paragraph_intro_paragraph. After running the migration, there is not much you can do to verify that it worked. Contrary to other entities, there is no user interface, available out of the box, that lists all paragraphs in the system. One way to verify if the migration worked is to manually create a View that shows paragraphs. Another way is to query the database directly. You can inspect the tables that store the paragraph fields’ data. In this example, the tables would be:

  • paragraph__field_ud_book_paragraph_author for the current author.
  • paragraph__field_ud_book_paragraph_title for the current title.
  • paragraph_r__8c3a9563ac for all the author revisions.
  • paragraph_r__3fa7e9863a for all the title revisions.

Each of those tables contains information about the bundle (paragraph type), the entity id, the revision id, and the migrated field value. Table names are derived from the machine names of the fields. If they are too long, the field name will be hashed to produce a shorter table name. Having to query the database is not ideal. Unfortunately, the options available to check if a paragraph migration worked are limited at the moment.

The node migration

The node migration will serve as the host for both referenced entities: images and paragraphs. The image migration is very similar to the one explained in a previous article. This time, the focus will be the paragraph migration. Both of them are set as dependencies of the node migration, so they need to be executed in advance. The following snippet shows how the source, destinations, and dependencies are set:

source: plugin: embedded_data data_rows: - unique_id: 1 name: 'Michele Metts' photo_file: 'P01' book_ref: 'B10' - unique_id: 2 name: 'Benjamin Melançon' photo_file: 'P02' book_ref: 'B20' - unique_id: 3 name: 'Stefan Freudenberg' photo_file: 'P03' book_ref: 'B30' ids: unique_id: type: integer destination: plugin: 'entity:node' default_bundle: ud_paragraphs migration_dependencies: required: - ud_migrations_paragraph_intro_image - ud_migrations_paragraph_intro_paragraph optional: []

Note that photo_file and book_ref both contain the unique identifier of records in the image and paragraph migrations, respectively. These can be used with the migration_lookup plugin to map the reference fields in the nodes to be migrated. ud_paragraphs is the machine name of the target content type.

The mapping of the image reference field follows the same pattern than the one explained in the article on migration dependencies. Using the migration_lookup plugin, you indicate which is the migration that should be searched for the images. You also specify which source column contains the unique identifiers that match those in the image migration. This operation will return a single value: the file ID (fid) of the image. This value can be assigned to the target_id subfield of field_ud_image to establish the relationship. The following code snippet shows how to do it:

field_ud_image/target_id: plugin: migration_lookup migration: ud_migrations_paragraph_intro_image source: photo_fileParagraph field mappings

Before diving into the paragraph field mapping, let’s think about what needs to be done. Paragraphs are revisioned entities. To make a reference to them, you need two IDs: their entity id and their entity revision id. These two values need to be assigned to two subfields of the paragraph reference field: target_id and target_revision_id respectively. You have to come up with a process pipeline that complies with this requirement. There are many ways to do it, and the specifics will depend on your field configuration. In this example, the paragraph reference field allows an unlimited number of paragraphs to be associated, but only of one type: ud_book_paragraph. Another thing to note is that even though the field allows you to add as many paragraphs as you want, the example migrates exactly one paragraph.

With those considerations in mind, the mapping of the paragraph field will be a two step process. First, use the migration_lookup plugin to get a reference to the paragraph. Second, use the fetched values to set the paragraph reference subfields. The following code snippet shows how to do it:

pseudo_mbe_book_paragraph: plugin: migration_lookup migration: ud_migrations_paragraph_intro_paragraph source: book_ref field_ud_favorite_book: plugin: sub_process source: - '@pseudo_mbe_book_paragraph' process: target_id: '0' target_revision_id: '1'

The first step is a normal migration_lookup procedure. The important difference is that instead of getting a single value, like with images, the paragraph lookup operation will return an array of two values. The format is like [3, 7] where the 3 represents the entity id and the 7 represents the entity revision id of the paragraph. Note that the array keys are not named. To access those values, you would use the index of the elements starting with zero (0). This will be important later. The returned array is stored in the pseudo_mbe_book_paragraph pseudofield.

The second step is to set the target_id and target_revision_id subfields. In this example, field_ud_favorite_book is the machine name paragraph reference field. Remember that it is configured to accept an arbitrary number of paragraphs, and each will require passing an array of two elements. This means you need to process an array of arrays. To do that, you use the sub_process plugin to iterate over an array of paragraph references. In this example, the structure to iterate over would be like this:

[ [3, 7] ]

Let’s dissect how to do the mapping of the paragraph reference field. The source configuration of the sub_process plugin contains an array of paragraph references. In the example, that array has a single element: the '@pseudo_mbe_book_paragraph' pseudofield. The quotes (') and at sign (@) are required to reuse an element that appears before in the process pipeline. Then, in the process configuration, you set the subfields for the paragraph reference field. It is worth noting that at this point you are iterating over a list of paragraph references, even if that list contains only one element. If you had more than one paragraph to migrate, whatever you defined in process will apply to all of them.

The process configuration is an array of subfield mappings. The left side of the assignment is the name of the subfield you want to set. The right side of the assignment is an array index of the paragraph reference being processed. Remember that this array does not have named-keys, so you use their numerical index to refer to them. The example sets the target_id subfield to the element in the 0 index and the target_revision_id subfield to the element in the one 1 index. Using the example data, this would be target_id: 3 and target_revision_id: 7. The quotes around the numerical indexes are important. If not used, the migration will not find the indexes and the paragraphs will not be associated. The end result of this operation will be something like this:

'field_ud_favorite_book' => array (1) [ array (2) [ 'target_id' => string (1) "3" 'target_revision_id' => string (1) "7" ] ]

There are three ways to run the migrations: manually, executing dependencies, and using tags. The following code snippet shows the three options:

# 1) Manually. $ drush migrate:import ud_migrations_paragraph_intro_image $ drush migrate:import ud_migrations_paragraph_intro_paragraph $ drush migrate:import ud_migrations_paragraph_intro_node # 2) Executing depenpencies. $ drush migrate:import ud_migrations_paragraph_intro_node --execute-dependencies # 3) Using tags. $ drush migrate:import --tag='UD Paragraphs Intro'

And that is one way to map paragraph reference fields. In the end, all you have to do is set the target_id and target_revision_id subfields. The process pipeline that gets you to that point can vary depending on how your paragraphs are configured. The following is a non-exhaustive list of things to consider when migrating paragraphs:

  • How many paragraphs types can be referenced?
  • How many paragraphs instances are being migrated? Is this a multivalue field?
  • Do paragraphs have translations?
  • Do paragraphs have revisions?
Do migrated paragraphs disappear upon node rollback?

Paragraphs migrations are affected by a particular behavior of revisioned entities. If the host entity is deleted, and the paragraphs do not have translations, the whole paragraph gets deleted. That means that deleting a node will make the referenced paragraphs’ data to be removed. How does this affect your migration workflow? If the migration of the host entity is rollback, then the paragraphs will be removed, the migrate API will not know about it. In this example, if you run a migrate status command after rolling back the node migration, you will see that the paragraph migration indicated that there are no pending elements to process. The file migration for the images will report the same, but in that case, the images will remain on the system.

In any migration project, it is common that you do rollback operations to test new field mappings or fix errors. Thus, chances are very high that you will stumble upon this behavior. Thanks to Damien McKenna for helping me understand this behavior and tracking it to the rollback() method of the EntityReferenceRevisions destination plugin. So, what do you do to recover the deleted paragraphs? You have to rollback both migrations: node and paragraph. And then, you have to import the two again. The following snippet shows how to do it:

# 1) Rollback both migrations. $ drush migrate:rollback ud_migrations_paragraph_intro_node $ drush migrate:rollback ud_migrations_paragraph_intro_paragraph # 2) Import both migrations againg. $ drush migrate:import ud_migrations_paragraph_intro_paragraph $ drush migrate:import ud_migrations_paragraph_intro_node

What did you learn in today’s blog post? Have you migrated paragraphs before? If so, what challenges have you found? Did you know paragraph reference fields require two subfields to be set? Did you that deleting the host entity also deletes referenced paragraphs? Please share your answers in the comments. Also, I would be grateful if you shared this blog post with others.

This blog post series, cross-posted at UnderstandDrupal.com as well as here on Agaric.coop, is made possible thanks to these generous sponsors. Contact Understand Drupal if your organization would like to support this documentation project, whether it is the migration series or other topics.

Read more and discuss at agaric.coop.

Hook 42: Dad Jokes, Development, and Drupal in Denver

Thu, 08/15/2019 - 20:47
Dad Jokes, Development, and Drupal in Denver Aimee Degnan Thu, 08/15/2019 - 18:47

Community Working Group posts: Announcing Drupal Event Code of Conduct Training

Thu, 08/15/2019 - 19:25

The Drupal Community Working Group is happy to announce that we've teamed up with Otter Tech to offer live, monthly, online Code of Conduct enforcement training for Drupal Event organizers and volunteers through the end of 2019. 

The training is designed to provide "first responder" skills to Drupal community members who take reports of potential Code of Conduct issues at Drupal events, including meetups, camps, conventions, and other gatherings. The workshops will be attended by Code of Conduct enforcement teams from other open source events, which will allow cross-pollination of knowledge with the Drupal community.

Each monthly online workshop is the same; community members only have to attend one monthly workshop of their choice to complete the training.  We strongly encourage all Drupal event organizers to consider sponsoring one or two persons' attendance at this workshop.

The monthly online workshops will be presented by Sage Sharp, Otter Tech's CEO and a diversity and inclusion leader in the open source community. From the official description of the workshop, it will include:

  • Practice taking a report of a potential Code of Conduct violation (an incident report)
  • Practice following up with the reported person
  • Instructor modeling on how to take a report and follow up on a report
  • One practice scenario for a report given at an event
  • One practice scenario for a report given in an online community
  • Discussion on bias, microaggressions, personal conflicts, and false reporting
  • Frameworks for evaluating a response to a report
  • 40 minutes total of Q&A time

In addition, we have received a Drupal Community Cultivation Grant to help defray the cost of the workshop for those that need assistance. The standard cost of the workshop is $350, Otter Tech has worked with us to allow us to provide the workshop for $300. To register for the workshop, first let us know that you're interested by completing this sign-up form - everyone who completes the form will receive a coupon code for $50 off the regular price of the workshop.

For those that require additional assistance, we have a limited number of $100 subsidies available, bringing the workshop price down to $200. Subsidies will be provided based on reported need as well as our goal to make this training opportunity available to all corners of our community. To apply for the subsidy, complete the relevant section on the sign-up form. The deadline for applying for the subsidy is end-of-business on Friday, September 6, 2019 - those selected for the subsidy will be notified after this date (in time for the September 9, 2019 workshop).

The workshops will be held on:

  • September 9 (Monday) at 3 pm to 7 pm U.S. Pacific Time / 8 am to 12 pm Australia Eastern Time
  • October 23 (Wednesday) at 5 am to 9 am U.S. Pacific Time / 2 pm to 6 pm Central European Time
  • November 14 (Thursday) at 6 pm to 10 pm U.S. Pacific Time / 1 pm to 5 pm Australia Eastern Time
  • December 4 (Wednesday) at 9 am to 1 pm U.S. Pacific Time / 6 pm to 10 pm Central European Time

Those that successfully complete the training will be (at their discretion) listed on Drupal.org (in the Drupal Community Workgroup section) as a means to prove that they have completed the training. We feel that moving forward, the Drupal community now has the opportunity to have professionally trained Code of Conduct contacts at the vast majority of our events, once again, leading the way in the open source community.

We are fully aware that the fact that the workshops will be presented in English limit who will be able to attend. We are more than interested in finding additional professional Code of Conduct workshops in other languages. Please contact us if you can assist.
 

InternetDevels: Great examples of high tech company websites built on Drupal

Thu, 08/15/2019 - 17:42

Drupal is moving to the future and adopts more and more innovative trends. No wonder that high tech engineering leaders trust Drupal and build their sites with it.

Drupal in high-tech: innovative companies + innovative CMS

They have found each other! Thinking about Drupal’s innovative spirit, we want to mention plenty of its capabilities, so here are at least a few:

Read more

Eelke Blok: Fighting content spam on Drupal with Akismet

Thu, 08/15/2019 - 16:15

Once, the Drupal community had Mollom, and everything was good. It was a web service that would let you use an API to scan comments and other user-submitted content and it would let your site know whether it thought it was spam, or not, so it could safely publish the content. Or not. It was created by our very own Dries Buytaert and obviously had a Drupal module. It was the service of choice for Drupal sites struggling with comment spam. Unfortunately, Mollom no longer exists. But there is an alternative, from the WordPress world: Akismet.

OSTraining: How to Group Entity Fields in Tabs in Drupal 8

Thu, 08/15/2019 - 07:46

Extensive nodes (or other types of entities) with many text fields, such as biographies, often remain unread because of the huge (and discouraging) amount of text.

The Drupal 8 "Field Group" module allows you to group fields and to present them in containers like vertical or horizontal tabs, accordions or just plain wrappers. It lets you group fields in the frontend of your site, and in the backend as well.

Keep reading to learn how to use this module!

OSTraining: How to Group Entity Fields in Tabs in Drupal 8

Thu, 08/15/2019 - 07:46

Extensive nodes (or other types of entities) with many text fields, such as biographies, often remain unread because of the huge (and discouraging) amount of text.

The Drupal 8 "Field Group" module allows you to group fields and to present them in containers like vertical or horizontal tabs, accordions or just plain

wrappers. Field Group lets you group fields in the Frontend of your site, and in the Backend as well.

Keep reading to learn how to use this module!

Agaric Collective: Migrating addresses into Drupal

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 20:55

Today we will learn how to migrate addresses into Drupal. We are going to use the field provided by the Address module which depends on the third-party library commerceguys/addressing. When migrating addresses you need to be careful with the data that Drupal expects. The address components can change per country. The way to store those components also varies per country. These and other important consideration will be explained. Let’s get started.

Getting the code

You can get the full code example at https://github.com/dinarcon/ud_migrations The module to enable is UD address whose machine name is ud_migrations_address. The migration to execute is udm_address. Notice that this migration writes to a content type called UD Address and one field: field_ud_address. This content type and field will be created when the module is installed. They will also be removed when the module is uninstalled. The demo module itself depends on the following modules: address and migrate.

Note: Configuration placed in a module’s config/install directory will be copied to Drupal’s active configuration. And if those files have a dependencies/enforced/module key, the configuration will be removed when the listed modules are uninstalled. That is how the content type and fields are automatically created and deleted.

The recommended way to install the Address module is using composer: composer require drupal/address. This will grab the Drupal module and the commerceguys/addressing library that it depends on. If your Drupal site is not composer-based, an alternative is to use the Ludwig module. Read this article if you want to learn more about this option. In the example, it is assumed that the module and its dependency were obtained via composer. Also, keep an eye on the Composer Support in Core Initiative as they make progress.

Source and destination sections

The example will migrate three addresses from the following countries: Nicaragua, Germany, and the United States of America (USA). This makes it possible to show how different countries expect different address data. As usual, for any migration you need to understand the source. The following code snippet shows how the source and destination sections are configured:

source: plugin: embedded_data data_rows: - unique_id: 1 first_name: 'Michele' last_name: 'Metts' company: 'Agaric LLC' city: 'Boston' state: 'MA' zip: '02111' country: 'US' - unique_id: 2 first_name: 'Stefan' last_name: 'Freudenberg' company: 'Agaric GmbH' city: 'Hamburg' state: '' zip: '21073' country: 'DE' - unique_id: 3 first_name: 'Benjamin' last_name: 'Melançon' company: 'Agaric SA' city: 'Managua' state: 'Managua' zip: '' country: 'NI' ids: unique_id: type: integer destination: plugin: 'entity:node' default_bundle: ud_address

Note that not every address component is set for all addresses. For example, the Nicaraguan address does not contain a ZIP code. And the German address does not contain a state. Also, the Nicaraguan state is fully spelled out: Managua. On the contrary, the USA state is a two letter abbreviation: MA for Massachusetts. One more thing that might not be apparent is that the USA ZIP code belongs to the state of Massachusetts. All of this is important because the module does validation of addresses. The destination is the custom ud_address content type created by the module.

Available subfields

The Address field has 13 subfields available. They can be found in the schema() method of the AddresItem class. Fields are not required to have a one-to-one mapping between their schema and the form widgets used for entering content. This is particularly true for addresses because input elements, labels, and validations change dynamically based on the selected country. The following is a reference list of all subfields for addresses:

  1. langcode for language code.
  2. country_code for country.
  3. administrative_area for administrative area (e.g., state or province).
  4. locality for locality (e.g. city).
  5. dependent_locality for dependent locality (e.g. neighbourhood).
  6. postal_code for postal or ZIP code.
  7. sorting_code for sorting code.
  8. address_line1 for address line 1.
  9. address_line2 for address line 2.
  10. organization for company.
  11. given_name for first name.
  12. additional_name for middle name.
  13. family_name for last name:

Properly describing an address is not trivial. For example, there are discussions to add a third address line component. Check this issue if you need this functionality or would like to participate in the discussion.

Address subfield mappings

In the example, only 9 out of the 13 subfields will be mapped. The following code snippet shows how to do the processing of the address field:

field_ud_address/given_name: first_name field_ud_address/family_name: last_name field_ud_address/organization: company field_ud_address/address_line1: plugin: default_value default_value: 'It is a secret ;)' field_ud_address/address_line2: plugin: default_value default_value: 'Do not tell anyone :)' field_ud_address/locality: city field_ud_address/administrative_area: state field_ud_address/postal_code: zip field_ud_address/country_code: country

The mapping is relatively simple. You specify a value for each subfield. The tricky part is to know the name of the subfield and the value to store in it. The format for an address component can change among countries. The easiest way to see what components are expected for each country is to create a node for a content type that has an address field. With this example, you can go to /node/add/ud_address and try it yourself. For simplicity sake, let’s consider only 3 countries:

  • For USA, city, state, and ZIP code are all required. And for state, you have a specific list form which you need to select from.
  • For Germany, the company is moved above first and last name. The ZIP code label changes to Postal code and it is required. The city is also required. It is not possible to set a state.
  • For Nicaragua, the Postal code is optional. The State label changes to Department. It is required and offers a predefined list to choose from. The city is also required.

Pay very close attention. The available subfields will depend on the country. Also, the form labels change per country or language settings. They do not necessarily match the subfield names. Moreover, the values that you see on the screen might not match what is stored in the database. For example, a Nicaraguan address will store the full department name like Managua. On the other hand, a USA address will only store a two-letter code for the state like MA for Massachusetts.

Something else that is not apparent even from the user interface is data validation. For example, let’s consider that you have a USA address and select Massachusetts as the state. Entering the ZIP code 55111 will produce the following error: Zip code field is not in the right format. At first glance, the format is correct, a five-digits code. The real problem is that the Address module is validating if that ZIP code is valid for the selected state. It is not valid for Massachusetts. 55111 is a ZIP code for the state of Minnesota which makes the validation fail. Unfortunately, the error message does not indicate that. Nine-digits ZIP codes are accepted as long as they belong to the state that is selected.

Finding expected values

Values for the same subfield can vary per country. How can you find out which value to use? There are a few ways, but they all require varying levels of technical knowledge or access to resources:

  • You can inspect the source code of the address field widget. When the country and state components are rendered as select input fields (dropdowns), you can have a look at the value attribute for the option that you want to select. This will contain the two-letter code for countries, the two-letter abbreviations for USA states, and the fully spelled string for Nicaraguan departments.
  • You can use the Devel module. Create a node containing an address. Then use the devel tab of the node to inspect how the values are stored. It is not recommended to have the devel module in a production site. In fact, do not deploy the code even if the module is not enabled. This approach should only be used in a local development environment. Make sure no module or configuration is committed to the repo nor deployed.
  • You can inspect the database. Look for the records in a table named node__field_[field_machine_name], if migrating nodes. First create some example nodes via the user interface and then query the table. You will see how Drupal stores the values in the database.

If you know a better way, please share it in the comments.

The commerceguys addressing library

With version 8 came many changes in the way Drupal is developed. Now there is an intentional effort to integrate with the greater PHP ecosystem. This involves using already existing libraries and frameworks, like Symfony. But also, making code written for Drupal available as external libraries that could be used by other projects. commerceguys\addressing is one example of a library that was made available as an external library. That being said, the Address module also makes use of it.

Explaining how the library works or where its fetches its database is beyond the scope of this article. Refer to the library documentation for more details on the topic. We are only going to point out some things that are relevant for the migration. For example, the ZIP code validation happens at the validatePostalCode() method of the AddressFormatConstraintValidator class. There is no need to know this for a migration project. But the key thing to remember is that the migration can be affected by third-party libraries outside of Drupal core or contributed modules. Another example, is the value for the state subfield. Address module expects a subdivision as listed in one of the files in the resources/subdivision directory.

Does the validation really affect the migration? We have already mentioned that the Migrate API bypasses Form API validations. And that is true for address fields as well. You can migrate a USA address with state Florida and ZIP code 55111. Both are invalid because you need to use the two-letter state code FL and use a valid ZIP code within the state. Notwithstanding, the migration will not fail in this case. In fact, if you visit the migrated node you will see that Drupal happily shows the address with the data that you entered. The problems arrives when you need to use the address. If you try to edit the node you will see that the state will not be preselected. And if you try to save the node after selecting Florida you will get the validation error for the ZIP code.

This validation issues might be hard to track because no error will be thrown by the migration. The recommendation is to migrate a sample combination of countries and address components. Then, manually check if editing a node shows the migrated data for all the subfields. Also check that the address passes Form API validations upon saving. This manual testing can save you a lot of time and money down the road. After all, if you have an ecommerce site, you do not want to be shipping your products to wrong or invalid addresses. ;-)

Technical note: The commerceguys/addressing library actually follows ISO standards. Particularly, ISO 3166 for country and state codes. It also uses CLDR and Google's address data. The dataset is stored as part of the library’s code in JSON format.

Migrating countries and zone fields

The Address module offer two more fields types: Country and Zone. Both have only one subfield value which is selected by default. For country, you store the two-letter country code. For zone, you store a serialized version of a Zone object.

What did you learn in today’s blog post? Have you migrated address before? Did you know the full list of subcomponents available? Did you know that data expectations change per country? Please share your answers in the comments. Also, I would be grateful if you shared this blog post with others.

This blog post series, cross-posted at UnderstandDrupal.com as well as here on Agaric.coop, is made possible thanks to these generous sponsors. Contact Understand Drupal if your organization would like to support this documentation project, whether it is the migration series or other topics.

Read more and discuss at agaric.coop.

Drudesk: Drupal 8 for marketers: key benefits & useful modules

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 15:51

It‘s easy and enjoyable to create marketing campaigns, drive leads, and tell your brand’s story to the world if your website is on the right CMS. Drupal 8’s benefits will definitely impress any marketer. So let’s take a closer look at the greatness of Drupal 8 for marketers, see what makes it so valuable, and name a few useful modules.

Web Wash: Use Taxonomy Terms as Webform Options in Drupal 8

Wed, 08/14/2019 - 03:30

Webform has a pretty robust system for managing lists of options. When you create a select box, you can define its options just for that element, or use a predefined list. If you go to Structure, Webforms, Configurations and click on Options, you can see all the predefined options and you can create your own.

If you want to learn how to create your own predefined options check out our tutorial; How to Use Webform Predefined Options in Drupal 8.

One thing to be aware of is that all of these options are stored as config files, which makes perfect sense, it is configuration.

But what if you want editors to manage the options?

Depending on how you deploy Drupal sites if you change an option only on the production site, your change will be overridden the next time you deploy to production because you import all new configuration changes.

To work around this, you could look at using Webform Config Ignore.

Another way of managing options is by using the Taxonomy system. An editor would simply manage all the terms from the Taxonomy page and nothing will be stored in config files.

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to create a select element which uses a taxonomy vocabulary instead of the standard options.

Hook 42: Exploring Contenta CMS

Tue, 08/13/2019 - 21:03
Exploring Contenta CMS Lindsey Gemmill Tue, 08/13/2019 - 19:03

TEN7 Blog's Drupal Posts: Case Study: Our Family Wizard

Tue, 08/13/2019 - 19:30
Website Redesign: A Professional Face for a Market Leader

When parents divorce or separate, the child often becomes the unwilling intermediary for communication. Our Family Wizard (OFW) is a mobile application for co-parenting exes that facilitates and tracks communication, helps coordinate child duties and stores important information.

Drupal blog: Increasing Drupal speaker diversity

Tue, 08/13/2019 - 19:23

This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog.

At Drupalcon Seattle, I spoke about some of the challenges Open Source communities like Drupal often have with increasing contributor diversity. We want our contributor base to look like everyone in the world who uses Drupal's technology on the internet, and unfortunately, that is not quite the reality today.

One way to step up is to help more people from underrepresented groups speak at Drupal conferences and workshops. Seeing and hearing from a more diverse group of people can inspire new contributors from all races, ethnicities, gender identities, geographies, religious groups, and more.

To help with this effort, the Drupal Diversity and Inclusion group is hosting a speaker diversity training workshop on September 21 and 28 with Jill Binder, whose expertise has also driven major speaker diversity improvements within the WordPress community.

I'd encourage you to either sign up for this session yourself or send the information to someone in a marginalized group who has knowledge to share, but may be hesitant to speak up. Helping someone see that their expertise is valuable is the kind of support we need in order to drive meaningful change.

Hook 42: Getting Started With Developer Environments

Tue, 08/13/2019 - 18:51
Getting Started With Developer Environments Lindsey Gemmill Tue, 08/13/2019 - 16:51

Acro Media: Using Drupal for Headless Ecommerce Customer Experiences

Tue, 08/13/2019 - 16:45

Back in April, BigCommerce, in partnership with Acro Media, announced the release of the BigCommerce for Drupal module. This module effectively bridges the gap between the BigCommerce SaaS ecommerce platform and the Drupal open source content management system. It allows Drupal to be used as the frontend customer experience engine for a headless BigCommerce ecommerce store.

For BigCommerce, this integration provides a new and exciting way to utilize their platform for creating innovative, content-rich commerce experiences that were not possible via BigCommerce alone.

For Drupal, this integration extends the options its users and site-builders have for adding ecommerce functionality into a Drupal site. The flexibility of Drupal combined with the stability and ease-of-use of BigCommerce opens up new possibilities for Drupal that didn’t previously exist.

Since the announcement, BigCommerce and Acro Media have continued to educate and promote this exciting new headless commerce option. A new post on the BigCommerce blog published last week title Leverage Headless Commerce To Transform Your User Experience with Drupal Ecommerce (link below) is a recent addition to this information campaign. The BigCommerce teams are experts in what they do and Acro Media is an expert in open source integrations and Drupal. They asked if we could provide an introduction for their readers to really explain what Drupal is and where it fits in to the headless commerce mix. This, of course, was an opportunity not to be missed and so our teams buckled down together once again to provide readers with the best information possible.

So without further explanation, click the link below to learn how you can leverage headless commerce to transform your user experience with Drupal.

Additional resources:

Drupal Association blog: Midwest Drupal Summit 2019

Tue, 08/13/2019 - 16:04

It's always wonderful to have Drupal community members gather in my hometown. Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA hosts the Midwest Drupal Summit (MWDS) every year in August since 2016. Previous MWDS events were held in Chicago, IL, Minneapolis, MN, and Madison, WI. This summit is three days of Drupal contribution, collaboration, and fun. The event is small but mighty. As with any contribution-focused Drupal event, MWDS is important because some of the most active community teams of the Drupal project dedicate time to work through challenges and celebrate what makes open source special.

I overheard several topics discussed over the three days.

  • Drupal.org infrastructure - its current state and ideas for improvements

  • Coordination between the Composer Initiative and core maintainers

  • The Automatic Updates initiative sprinting on package signing

  • Ideas for Contribution Credit system enhancements, to expand recognition beyond activity that takes place on Drupal.org

  • Drupal core contributors and the Drupal Association engineering team collaborating on critical Drupal 9 release blockers

  • The Security Team talking through ongoing work

  • Gitlab merge requests workflow and UI

  • Connecting the work that contributors are doing across various projects

  • Fun social events


Group lunch in Ann Arbor.

This opportunity to listen and overhear the thought and care that go into Drupal is one I appreciate. It was fantastic to hear a community member tell the Drupal Association team that they are "impressed with the gitlab work. I created a sandbox and the URL worked." It's one thing to see public feedback on the work done for the community, it's a whole other thing to hear it in person.


Contribution in several forms - talking through ideas, blockers, giving feedback and opinions are just a few ways to participate.

Local midwesterners who take the time to attend MWDS get an opportunity to dive in to contribution on a variety of topics. There are always mentors and subject-matter experts ready to help. My own Drupal core commit happened at a past MWDS - where I gave feedback on an issue from the perspective of a content editor. This year, Wilson S. had a first-time commit on issue #3008029 and usually there's at least one first-time commit. A memorable one being the time Megan (megansanicki) had her first commit, which was also a live commit by Angie Byron (webchick).

Here's what a few participants had to say about their experience:

"I feel inspired as I watch the local community and visitors organically interact and participate with the discussions held around them." ~ Matthew Radcliffe (mradcliffe)

“This was my first Drupal Code Sprint event. Meeting all the great people from near and afar in person was awesome. Matthew Radcliffe helped me overcome my apprehension of contributing to Drupal Core. I look forward to continuing contributing and connecting with the community.” ~ Phill Tran (philltran

"As a recent re-transplant back to Michigan, I wanted to get back in touch with my local Drupal community. Being a FE dev, sometimes it's hard to find things to contribute via core or porting of modules. Some of the content analysis and accessibility testing was really interesting to me. As someone who has not contributed in the past @mradcliff was an excellent teacher on how to get the sprint environment up and running and how to get started on issues." ~ Chris Sands (chrissands)

"As part of the Drupal Association staff, I find MWDS is always a wonderful opportunity to connect with some key community members and create more alignment between DA initiatives and community-driven work. It's also a wonderful time to catch up with Drupal family." ~ Tim Lehnen (hestenet)

"Always the best event of the year." ~ xjm

“I am glad to have met everyone. I had a one-on-one mentoring session with Matthew Radcliffe. It’s priceless!” ~ Wilson Suprapto (wilsonsp)

Did I mention that Chris also became a Drupal Association member during this event?! Thanks Chris!

The Drupal Association engineering team members are in daily contact with the community online. However, in-person events are serendipitous. The insight from community members who have expertise to help Drupal.org improve for everyone is right here in the room. New contributors need only consider that the first step is any move you make to participate. I think this timely tweet I saw over the weekend sums it up:

The great thing about open source is you can often just contribute. Jump in and help - there's tons of documentation help needed, but open issues, bugs, etc. Start small but why not start today?

— Nick Ruffilo (@NickRuffilo) August 10, 2019

Special thanks to Michael Hess for organizing this event and Neha & Danny from University of Michigan for making sure everyone had a fantastic time.


Tim at the Treeline, on a zipline!

For reference, here are the issues that moved forward during the event.

Specbee: AMP It Up! The Why and How of Drupal AMP (And what it can do to your website)

Tue, 08/13/2019 - 15:08
AMP It Up! The Why and How of Drupal AMP (And what it can do to your website) Shefali Shetty 13 Aug, 2019 Top 10 best practices for designing a perfect UX for your mobile app

When the open-source Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) project was launched in October 2015, Google AMP was often compared to Facebook's Instant Articles. Nonetheless, both of the tech-giants share a common goal – to make web pages load faster. While AMP can be reached with a web URL, Facebook’s Instant Articles aimed only at easing the pain for their app-users. Teaming up with some powerful launch partners in the publishing and technology sectors, Google AMP aimed to impact the future of content distribution on mobile devices.

Fast forward to today, and Google AMP is the hottest thing on the internet. With over 25 million website domains that have published over 4 Billion AMP pages, it did not take long for the project to be a huge success. Comprising of two main features; Speed and Support to Monetization of Objects, AMPs implications are far reaching for enterprise businesses, marketers, ecommerce and every other big and small organizations. With great features and the fact that its origin as a Google Initiative, it is no surprise that the AMP pages get featured in Google SERP more prominently. 

What is AMP?

With the rapid surge in mobile users, the need to provide a website-like user experience does not just cut it. Today mobile user’s come with a smaller attention-span and varied internet speeds. Businesses can cater to each of these challenge with a fast-loading, light-weight and an app-like website with Google AMP.

AMP is an open-source framework that simplifies the HTML, streamlines CSS rules, restricts use of Javascript (can use AMP’s component library instead) and delivers pages via a Google AMP cache (a proxy-based Content Delivery Network).

Why AMP??

Impacting the technical architecture of digital assets, Google's open source initiative aims to provide streamlined web pages to mobile browsers and other apps.

It is Fast, like Really Fast

Google AMP loads about twice as fast as a normal comparable mobile page and the latency is as less as one-tenth. Intended to provide the fastest experience for mobile users, customers will be able to access content faster, and they are more likely to stay on the page to make a purchase or enquire about your service, because they know it won't take long.

An Organic Boost

Eligibility for the AMP carousal that rests above the other search results on Google SERP, resulting in a substantial increase in organic result and traffic is a major boost for the visibility of an organization. Though not responsible for increasing the page authority and domain authority, Google AMP plays a key role in sending far more traffic your way.

ROI

The fact that AMP leverages and not disrupts the existing web infrastructure of a website, makes the cost of adopting AMP much lesser than the competing technologies. In return, Google AMP enables better user experience which translates to better conversion rates on mobile devices.

Drupal & AMP

With better user engagement, higher dwell time and easy navigation between content benefits, businesses are bound to drive more traffic with AMP-friendly pages and increase their revenue. The AMP module is especially useful for marketers as it is a great addition to optimize their Drupal SEO efforts.

AMP produces HTML that makes the web a faster place. Implementing the AMP module in Drupal is really simple. Just download, enable and configure!
Before you begin with the integration of AMP module with Drupal, you need -
AMP Module : The AMP module mainly handles the conversion of regular Drupal HTML pages to AMP-complaint pages.

Two main components of AMP module:

AMP Module : The AMP module mainly handles the conversion of regular Drupal HTML pages to AMP-complaint pages.
Two main components of AMP module:

AMP Theme: I'm sure you have come across AMP HTML and its standards. The one that are responsible for your content to look effective and perform well on mobile. The Drupal AMP theme produces the mark up required by these standards for websites looking to perform well in the mobile world. Also, AMP theme allows creation of custom-made AMP pages.

AMP PHP Library: Consisting of the AMP base theme and the ExAMPle sub-theme, the Drupal AMP PHP Library handles the final corrections. Users can also create their own AMP sub-theme from scratch, or modify the default ExAMPle sub-theme for their specific requirements.

How to setup AMP with Drupal?

Before you integrate AMP with Drupal, you need to understand that AMP does not replace your entire website. Instead, at its essence, the AMP module provides a view mode for content types, which is displayed when the browser asks for an AMP version.

Download the AMP Module

With your local prepped up, type the following terminal command:

drush dl amp, amptheme, composer_manager

This command will download the AMP module, the AMP theme and the Composer Manager module (suppose if you do not have the Composer Manager already).

If you have been a user of Drupal 8,  you are probably familiar with Composer and its function as a packaging tool for PHP that installs dependencies for a project. The composer is used to install a PHP library that converts raw HTML into AMP HTML. Also, the composer will help to get that library working with Drupal.

However, as the AMP module does not explicitly require Composer Manager for a dependency, alternate workflows can make use of module Composer files without using Composer Manager.

Next, enable the items that are required to get started:

drush en composer_manager, amptheme, ampsubtheme_example

Before enabling the AMP module itself, an AMP sub-theme needs to be enabled. The default configuration for the AMP module sets the AMP Theme to ‘ExAMPle subtheme.’

How to Enable AMP Module?

The AMP module for Drupal can be enabled using Drush. Once the module is enabled, the Composer Manager will take care of the downloading of the other AMP libraries and its dependencies.

drush en amp

Configuration

Once everything is installed and enabled, AMP needs to be configured using a web interface before the Drupal AMP pages can be displayed. First up, you need to decide which content types should have an AMP version. You might not need it for all of them. Enable particular content type by clicking on the “Enable AMP in Custom Display Settings” link. On the next page, open the “Custom Display Settings” fieldset. Check the AMP box, then click Save.

Setting an AMP Theme

Once the AMP module and content type is configured, it is time to select a theme for AMP pages and configure it. The view modules and the field formatters of the Drupal AMP module take care of the main content of the page. The Drupal AMP theme, on the other hand, changes the mark-up outside the main content area of the page.

Also, the Drupal AMP themes enables you to create custom styles for your AMP pages. On the main AMP config page, make sure that the setting for the AMP theme is set to the ExAMPle Subtheme or the custom AMP subtheme that you created.

One thing is certain. Google favours websites that provide the best experience possible for mobile users. With tough competition from Facebook Instant Articles and Apple News, Google AMP aims to decrease page loading time to influence the user experience. Drupal websites can leverage the AMP module that can produce AMP HTML and substantially speed up web page loading time. Beyond the success of publishers and ecommerce websites on Drupal 8,  a number of other websites are utilizing AMP along with the inclusion of progressive web apps. With a bright future ahead, Google AMP will be one of the strongest tools for traffic generation and conversions.
 

Drupal Planet Shefali ShettyApr 05, 2017 Subscribe For Our Newsletter And Stay Updated Subscribe Shefali ShettyApr 05, 2017 Recent Posts Image AMP It Up! The Why and How of Drupal AMP (And what it can do to your website) Image Setup Responsive Images in Drupal 8 - A Step-by-Step Guide Image Top 15 Drupal Distributions for Accelerating Your Web Development Process Explore Our Drupal Services TAKE ME THERE Featured Success Stories

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