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Appnovation Technologies: Appnovator Spotlight: Janice Cheer

Tue, 10/10/2017 - 09:00
Appnovator Spotlight: Janice Cheer Meet Janice Cheer, Sales Enablement from Vancouver, BC. 1. Who are you? What's your story? /*-->*/ /*-->*/ /*-->*/ I’m a Chinese-Canadian who grew up in a small town called Squamish. After finishing high school, I moved out to Vancouver for school and obtained my Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration with a minor in Marketing. Sin...

Hook 42: September A11Y (Accessibility) Talk Review

Tue, 10/10/2017 - 03:20

We have all heard about website accessibility and know what it means in a broad sense, but what does website accessibility look like in a practical sense?

This month’s A11Y Talk featured Scott O'Hara from The Paciello Group. In this A11Y Talk, Scott O'Hara addressed questions like:
- How do I get started in a11y?
- How do I get my team to care about it?
- Where does one start in trying to incorporate a11y into the work they or their team produce?
- Who is in charge of a11y at your company anyway?

Palantir: Drupal 8 is Great for Showing Solutions Quickly

Mon, 10/09/2017 - 18:45
Drupal 8 is Great for Showing Solutions Quickly #D8isGr8 brandt Mon, 10/09/2017 - 11:45 Luke Wertz Oct 9, 2017

The #D8isGr8 blog series will focus on why we love Drupal 8 and how it provides solutions for our clients. This post in the series comes from Luke Wertz, Solution Architect.

We want to make your project a success.

Let's Chat.

We often work on projects with clients who are juggling strict timelines and multiple stakeholders. From the time a vendor is selected, to contract signing and project kick-off meetings, it can sometimes be a whole month before our production team is able to really dig into a new project.

The thing I love about Drupal 8 is that it gives us the ability to skip parts of the prototyping phase and get into rapid proof of concept work very quickly. We can quickly demonstrate to our clients the problem space they’re working in and a potential solution. Drupal 8 allows us to get there quickly without writing a lot of code, which means our client product owners are able to show progress to their stakeholders sooner.

This proof of concept work is enabled by the functionality that is now baked into Drupal 8 core. In previous versions of Drupal, Views was a contrib module. A lot of how Views functions in Drupal 8 is the same as before, but that extra step of having to install, deploy, and configure it has been removed.

The ability to show value to a client early and quickly is reflective of Palantir’s move to Agile development. We are a data-driven company, and we like to use quantitative methods to prove our value to our clients. Drupal 8 helps us to iterate rapidly: have an idea, quickly show how it might work, test it, and prove it.

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aleksip.net: Reasons for choosing standards-based technologies

Mon, 10/09/2017 - 17:12
The recent announcement that Drupal is looking to adopt React has inspired me to live up to my Twitter bio, and be an active advocate for open standards-based technologies. While my knee-jerk reaction to the announcement was to focus on React, this blog post approaches the topic of adopting technologies in a more general manner, while still aiming to contribute to the current front-end framework discussion.

Valuebound: Step-by-step guide to Foundation framework to develop responsive web applications

Mon, 10/09/2017 - 14:55

Creating responsive websites have always remained a challenge for many even I faced similar difficulties in the beginning. Recently, our team came across a situation where we had to design a responsive and beautiful website in Drupal 8 for a media and publishing firm. In order to create such an amazing site, we came up with an idea to use Foundation Framework and yes! it worked.

I have written this blog to help anyone having difficulty in understanding the Foundation framework to develop responsive websites as it is a rising market demand. My idea is that this article will be a "living laboratory" to help you in understanding Foundation from the scratch. The post comprises an intro of Foundation, its features, comparison…

Amazee Labs: Tour de DrupAlps - My Amazee Extreme Challenge Recap

Mon, 10/09/2017 - 13:00
Tour de DrupAlps - My Amazee Extreme Challenge Recap

Recently, I took a month off to do the Amazee Extreme Challenge: after 3 years, each of us gets the opportunity to do something we would like to challenge ourselves with. In 31 days, I cycled from Switzerland over the Alps to DrupalCon Vienna. This post is intended to reflect on how my journey went and share some of the experiences I had while riding the DrupAlps tour.

Josef Dabernig Mon, 10/09/2017 - 13:00

#DrupAlps Tour Summary:

Planning & preparations

Late 2016 I started brainstorming ideas for my extreme challenge. Initially, my plan was to hike the alps from mountain hut to mountain hut. After considering the security risk: being hiking alone in the mountains for a month, I decided to go via bicycle where at least I would be able to get help via paved roads if needed. Being a passionate cyclist, climbing the Alps was a dream for a long time already.

How did I plan out the route? Initially it was really hard to tell how much I would be able to cycle. I guessed an average of 80 kilometers per day and around 1500 meters of elevation gain should be fine. Planning out the tour was really fun - basically, I would try research the most beautiful and challenging mountain passes that you can cycle with a road bike. The quäldich site was a great resource to research challenging mountain passes and I used Strava to put together the route. Over the months of planning and during riding, the tour planning adapted flexibly. A map that compares initial versus ridden planning can be found here.

Apart from knowing where to go, I also needed to get in shape and equipped for the ride. Early 2017 I started cycling the Swiss mountain passes as soon as they opened and was getting more and more experience about which equipment and food I would need during the days.

In terms of equipment, I decided to get a race bike (Rose XEON RS-4400) which is really lightweight but still made of aluminium which I thought would be a more reliable material compared to today’s popular carbon frames. As I planned to take all my luggage with me for an entire month and in order to be able to cycle high-alpine mountain passes, I decided to get two compact bags. The Ortlieb Seat-Pack takes up to 16.5 liters and fixates behind the seat post. In addition to that, after quite some research I decided to the custom, tailor-fitted G219 Blade Frame Bag from Wanderlust Equipment. It took me a while to figure out the minimal set of cloths required to keep me dry, warm and adaptable. Weather conditions ranged from between 35 and -5 degrees, sometimes it was sunny, cloudy, windy or just rainy - but in the end, the combination of bags turned out to work out really nicely.

As I started to work 80% at the beginning of May, I was able to do weekend rides from Friday to Sunday to get used to the saddle. All the preparations were really helpful but still, there was a great deal of uncertainty as I never had ridden more than 3 days in a row and would be going to ride for an entire month.

The first week - Zürich to Italy and back to Switzerland

August 25, my bike was finally packed and I was ready to get going. After a lovely breakfast with the Amazee team in the office and with some joining remotely via Zoom, it was time to say goodbye for a month and start the journey.

Well equipped with two Rapha shirts - one from Urs for the colder days and one from my girlfriend for the hot days - I was happy to start cycling. I was slowly getting into a daily routine of taking Instagram photos, navigating using Locus map and sharing the rides on my Strava profile.

The first weekend was already packed with highlights. I joined 2000+ cyclists for the minimal version of the Alpenbrevet. I did the bronze tour which covered two passes, while some of the most eager cyclists did 5 passes with a total elevation gain of 7000 meters!

After Grimsel, Furka and Gotthardpass I had passed the alps for the first time. The upcoming days I cycled along the beautiful lakes Lago Maggiore, Lago Lugano and Lago di Como crossing the Swiss/Italian border surprisingly often. Weather conditions were perfect and it was fun to start adapting the route a bit when I had enough buffer time.

Second week - Berninapass, Stelvio, Timmelsjoch and up to Germany

After a week, the first rain was hitting just in time for a day break near St. Moritz in Engadin to relax and wait for my friend Riccardo Bessone. Riccardo was traveling day and night with busses and trains to get to this place. After a relaxed breakfast and during heavy rains outside it was time for us to take the challenge and go cycling. This quite epic ride took us from heavy rains to heavy snow falls up to Berninapass and we were happy to find shelter on our way down where we could warm up the frozen fingers at a fire place and rest a bit before we headed further via Tirano up again to Bormio.

The second day of our shared weekend we cycled the Gavia Pass. Luckily the weather was sunny again, so we could enjoy a scenery full of snow-covered mountains at an elevation of above 2600 meters.

Leaving that beautiful scenery behind us, we rode some kilometers further over Passo Tonale into the Trentino valley where I would continue my journey alone and say hi to lots of fresh apples that helped my daily need for calories.

Another highlight for sure was climbing Passo Stelvio - with 2757 meters the 2nd highest paved mountain pass of Alps. After a long day of easy riding, I decided to take the climb still around 4 pm in the afternoon and was really happy to have almost no traffic on the streets. Together with some cyclists from the UK, we arrived at the top before sunset and a bit of snow fall started, just in time to find shelter at one of the pretty much empty hotels.  

While riding I usually was pretty much alone on the roads. There was plenty of time to reflect, do some thinking but I also listened to a lot of Podcasts to feed my brain. From time to time I would meet inspiring people which did similar long-distance rides, such as this guy from Thailand that tested his bicycle after attending the Eurobike show.

Another magical moment was cycling over the Timmelsjoch from Südtirol to Austria. I was able to change my route so that I would cycle the pass already a week earlier from south up north instead of going down via the pass a week later on. On the top of the mountain, the weather changed from being sunny the whole day long into the mountain being covered by a cloud and quite some rainfalls. But it wasn’t too bad, so I kept going slowly and soon could enjoy some spectacular scenery. See the “Himmelsloch am Timmelsloch” as identified by Greg and depicted above.

Approaching the end of week 2, my road bike joined me for some off-road action. The Schrofen Pass is popular amongst mountain bikers that carry their bike over the hiking trail. Trying to avoid busy roads in that area and equipped with a much lighter bike I enjoyed carrying my road bike over the pass.

Third week - Dolomites and up to Austria

After another break at a friends wedding in Germany, it was time to cycle down to Italy again where I enjoyed some of the most beautiful scenery of the tour. Especially when the clouds disappeared and the unique peaks of the Dolomites started shining through, I know that each single investment into this entire tour was worth the effort.

After spending some days in the dolomites, I approached the last week of my tour. My uncle Wolfgang “Radlwolf” Dabernig, together with his friend Kurti would meet me in Italy from where we cycled the Plöckenpass together. While I enjoyed cycling on my own, trips together like this one with friends and family as part of my tour really where great intermediate steps of my tour as we could share the excitement about the tour and spend valuable time together.

Fourth week - Rains, Kärnten, Slovenia up to Linz / Danube

Entering Kärnten also meant the beginning of an entire week of rain. Cycling in the rain was tough but I was lucky to have all the equipment and mental health needed to survive even the hard days. As long as you keep moving you usually don’t get cold. Rain jacket, rain trousers, and overshoes plus a warm soup would save my days.

Cycling through the Alps also meant visiting different regions, different countries and getting in touch with many different cultures. I crossed borders 17 times and was happy we don’t have border controls anymore thanks to being part of Schengen Area.

It’s hard to summarize the diversity of impressions I had during the tour in a single blog post with a few pictures. What I for sure can tell is that late August to late September turned out to be a great season for cycling. While in the beginning it was really hot and I was glad to take a swim in one of the lakes, the later weeks of the tour turned out to be rather chilly. On the flipside, those early Autumn weeks made for some beautiful visual impressions.

Final stretch - Linz to Vienna

From Kärnten I would cycle up to Linz, crossing the Alps for the last time. Because of a landslide of the heavy rains, the Sölkpass was closed and I had to take a detour via Radstätter Tauernpass which turned out just fine (and snowcovered) too. As I was getting closer to my final destination, DrupalCon Vienna, I had gotten into a routine of organizing my day pack of clothes into the above-depicted bags.

On the last weekend, Ricardo joined me again to cycle along the danube. After a long day on Saturday from Linz to Krems, the last day of cycling was planned to be a relaxed one. In Tulln, we stopped for lunch at the webshapers office where we met more friends from the Drupal community. Together, we cycled the leg to Vienna and even added in two small extra passes before arriving in Vienna. At the Schweizerhaus, a group of Amazee’s, DrupalCon attendees, friends and family were meeting us and I was happy to finish the DrupAlps tour healthy and without any injuries.

Cycling the Alps for a month was an incredible experience, I can definitely recommend. I think I was happy to not have any major issues along the way and I was also really glad that the adaptive planning of the tour worked out even better than I had hoped for. Thanks so much for everyone who has helped me achieve this goal! Without all the great support that I received, the DrupAlps tour wouldn’t have been the positive experience it has been!

What’s next? I am also happy to be back at the office, starting my new role as Agile Consultant with the Amazee Labs Zürich team. In an upcoming post, I will certainly talk more about what’s going on in this area.

Thanks for reading and following my tour! For now, if you are interested, here are some more resources:

Lullabot: Behind the Screens with Jason and Stew of Amazee Labs

Mon, 10/09/2017 - 06:00
In this episode, Chris sits down with Jason Lewis and Stew West of Amazee Labs to get the low down on Drupal Camp Cape Town. They discuss what it's like organizing a Drupal camp in Southern Africa; convince you to visit Cape Town; and give some thanks to their amazing colleagues at Amazee. Also, if the internet goes out, keep an eye out for Amazee's (probably) first ever touring Drupal band!

Daniel Pocock: A step change in managing your calendar, without social media

Sun, 10/08/2017 - 19:36

Have you been to an event recently involving free software or a related topic? How did you find it? Are you organizing an event and don't want to fall into the trap of using Facebook or Meetup or other services that compete for a share of your community's attention?

Are you keen to find events in foreign destinations related to your interest areas to coincide with other travel intentions?

Have you been concerned when your GSoC or Outreachy interns lost a week of their project going through the bureaucracy to get a visa for your community's event? Would you like to make it easier for them to find the best events in the countries that welcome and respect visitors?

In many recent discussions about free software activism, people have struggled to break out of the illusion that social media is the way to cultivate new contacts. Wouldn't it be great to make more meaningful contacts by attending more a more diverse range of events rather than losing time on social media?

Making it happen

There are already a number of tools (for example, Drupal plugins and Wordpress plugins) for promoting your events on the web and in iCalendar format. There are also a number of sites like Agenda du Libre and GriCal who aggregate events from multiple communities where people can browse them.

How can we take these concepts further and make a convenient, compelling and global solution?

Can we harvest event data from a wide range of sources and compile it into a large database using something like PostgreSQL or a NoSQL solution or even a distributed solution like OpenDHT?

Can we use big data techniques to mine these datasources and help match people to events without compromising on privacy?

Why not build an automated iCalendar "to-do" list of deadlines for events you want to be reminded about, so you never miss the deadlines for travel sponsorship or submitting a talk proposal?

I've started documenting an architecture for this on the Debian wiki and proposed it as an Outreachy project. It will also be offered as part of GSoC in 2018.

Ways to get involved

If you would like to help this project, please consider introducing yourself on the debian-outreach mailing list and helping to mentor or refer interns for the project. You can also help contribute ideas for the specification through the mailing list or wiki.

Mini DebConf Prishtina 2017

This weekend I've been at the MiniDebConf in Prishtina, Kosovo. It has been hosted by the amazing Prishtina hackerspace community.

Watch out for future events in Prishtina, the pizzas are huge, but that didn't stop them disappearing before we finished the photos:

Bay Area Drupal Camp: Sign-up for BADCamp Training Classes

Sun, 10/08/2017 - 19:17
Sign-up for BADCamp Training Classes Anne Sun, 10/08/2017 - 10:17am

The following training classess still have spots available:  

 

Local Drupal 8 Development with Containers - Wednesday

8am-noon - by Mobomo with Miles McLean and Cameron Eagans

There are many ways to develop a Drupal site, but there are few that offer as many advantages as a fully self-contained, local environment. This training session will get hands on with setting up an environment from scratch using Docker containers to emulate production servers, Composer to manage packages, Drush to manage configuration, Drupal Console to generate code, and source code management to tie it all together.

 

Getting Started with Drupal - Wednesday

by Agaric & Digital Echidna with Mauricio Dinarte

This training is aimed to people just starting with Drupal. Basic concepts will be explained are later put into practice. The objective is that someone, who might not even know about Drupal, can understand the different concepts and building blocks to create a website using this CMS.

 

SEO & Accessibility - Wednesday

by Hook 42 with Aimee Degnan and Carie Fisher

SEO stands for "Search Engine Optimization." Improving your website's SEO can translate into more visitors, better conversions, and more sales.

Accessibility refers to the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people who experience disabilities.

When properly configured, Drupal is a very SEO-friendly and Accessible web framework. The trick is to know which Drupal modules you need to install and how to optimally configure them. Configuration doesn’t stop at the module level - a solid content strategy is required to make the most Accessible and optimized website. “Content is King” and our job is to make Drupal showcase content in the most effective way to all consumers and search engines.

 

Object Oriented PHP - Wednesday

by Chapter Three

With the move to Drupal 8 everyone who works in the PHP layer will be exposed to more and more to object­ oriented code. Come learn the basics of working with objects in PHP and how OOP can help you to write well­ structured code

 

Drupal Crash Course for Non-Developers - Wednesday

by Promet Source with Margaret Plett

Are you responsible for project management, content, or vendor selection and preparing to work with Drupal? This one-day training delivers all of the tools you need to get started. Delivered by an Acquia Certified Drupal Developer, this training will answer the questions you didn’t even know to ask!

 

Component-based Theming with Twig - Thursday

by Forum One with Chaz Chumley

Join Forum One as they walk through the theming variations that started with the traditional theme-centric design and has quickly moved into component-based design. Together you will master Component-based theming with Twig as you work to identify patterns, define components, utilize command line tools such as Composer, NPM and Grunt to quickly create a PatternLab managed theme. Learn how to work smarter in developing components that can easily be integrated into project after project without having to recreate them yourself.

 

Theming Drupal 8 - Thursday

by Drupalize.me with Joe Shindelar

Themes combine HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and Drupal in order to make beautiful websites. Creating truly unique themes requires knowing how to use the Twig template language to manipulate HTML, how to add CSS and JavaScript assets in a way that's compatible with Drupal's caching, all while maintaining the flexibility that Drupal is known for.

 

Content Strategy for Drupal 8 - Thursday

by Evolving Web with Suzanne Deracheva

Drupal is a powerful tool for managing structured content. Many Drupal projects revolve around producing, displaying and organizing content effectively. This course will walk you through the process of creating a content strategy for your next Drupal project, and planning out how that content will be structured in Drupal. Whether you're creating a brand new site or migrating to Drupal, you'll learn techniques that will help you build a solid content strategy and a successful Drupal website.

 

Intro to Backdrop CMS - Thursday

by Nate & Jen Lampton

Backdrop CMS is for the small to medium sized business, non-profits, educational institutions, and companies or organizations who are delivering comprehensive websites on a budget. This introductory training will cover the basics of creating and administering a website with Backdrop CMS.

 

Drupal 8 Configuration System Basics - Thursday

by DrupalEasy with Mike Anello

The Drupal 8 configuration system can provide great advantages to managing the configuration of a site, but it can also cause massive headaches if used improperly. This presentation will provide an overview of how the Drupal 8 configuration system works, best practices on basic workflows to utilize it effectively, and a small sampling of some of the contributed modules available to enhance it.

 

 

BADCamp is 100% volunteer run and 100% funded by our sponsors and the support of our local community. Thank you!

Drupal Planet

Matt Glaman: Drupal 8 Development Cookbook - Second Edition

Sun, 10/08/2017 - 02:54
Drupal 8 Development Cookbook - Second Edition mglaman Sat, 10/07/2017 - 19:54

During DrupalCon Vienna, the second edition of the Drupal 8 Development Cookbook was published! The Drupal 8 Development Cookbook published just over a year ago, right after Drupal 8.1 was released. I had written the book for 8.0 with "just in case" notes for what might change in Drupal 8.1. What I was not prepared for: how well the minor release system worked and provided rapid gains in feature changes.

Drupal.org blog: An update on projects created for Drupal

Sat, 10/07/2017 - 09:00

About six months ago we made a significant change to the way that modules, themes, and distributions are created on Drupal.org.

In the past, contributors had to first create a sandbox project, and then request manual review of their project in the Project Applications issue queue. The benefit of this community-driven moderation process was that modules were vetted for code quality and security issues by a group of volunteers. Project maintainers who completed this process also received the benefit of security advisory coverage from the Security Team for stable releases of their projects.

Unfortunately, the rate of project applications outpaced what volunteers could keep up with, and many worthy projects were never promoted to full project status, or moved off of Drupal.org to be hosted elsewhere.

To ameliorate this issue, we changed the process so that any confirmed user on Drupal.org may now make full projects.

To mitigate the risks of low code quality or security vulnerabilities we added new signals to project pages: including highlighting which release is recommended by the maintainer, displaying recent test results, and indicating whether the project receives security coverage both on the project page and in the composer 'extra' attribute. We're continuing to work on identifying additional signals of project quality that we can include, as well as surfacing some of this information in Drupal core. We also converted the project applications issue queue into a 'request security advisory coverage' issue queue.

What we hoped to see

We knew this would be a significant change for the project and the community. While many community members were excited to see the gates to contribution opened, others were concerned about security issues and Drupal's reputation for code quality.

Our prediction was that the lower barrier to contribution would result in an increase in full projects created on Drupal.org. This would indicate that new contributors or third party technology providers were finding it easier to integrate with Drupal and contribute those integrations back for use by others.

At the same time, we also expected to see an increase in the number of full projects that do not receive coverage from the security team. The question was whether this increase would be within an acceptable range, or represent a flood of low quality or insecure modules.

The results

The table below provides statistics about the full projects created on Drupal.org in the 5 months before March 17th, 2017 - when we opened the creation of full projects to all confirmed users.

Full projects created from 2016-10-16 to 2017-03-17…

#

% of projects created in this period

… without stable release

431

55.76%

… with stable releases

342

44.24%

… with usage >= 50 sites

237

30.66%

… with usage >= 50 sites and without stable release

68

8.80%

… with usage >= 50 sites and with stable release

169

21.86%

… with an open security coverage application*

18

2.33%

Sub-total with security coverage

342

44.24%

Sub-total without security coverage

431

55.76%

Sub-total with security coverage and >=50 usage

169

21.86%

Sub-total without security coverage and >= 50 usage

68

8.80%

Total

773

* note: full projects that did not have stable releases were not automatically opted in to security coverage when we opened the full project creation gates.

… and this table provides statistics about the projects created in the 5 months after we opened the creation of full projects to all confirmed users:

Full projects created from 2017-03-17 to 2017-08-16…

#

Diff

% of projects created

Diff %

… without stable release

851

+420

69.53%

+97%

… with stable releases

373

+31

30.47%

+9%

… with usage >= 50 sites

156

-81

12.75%

-34%

… with usage >= 50 sites and without stable release

64

-4

5.23%

-6%

… with usage >= 50 sites and with stable release

92

-77

7.52%

+46%

… with an open security coverage application

62

+44

5.07%

+344%

Sub-total with security coverage

182

-160

14.87%

-53%

Sub-total without security coverage

1,042

+611

85.13%

+242%

Sub-total with security coverage and >=50 usage

54

-115

4.41%

-32%

Sub-total without security coverage and >= 50 usage

102

+34

8.33%

+150%

Total

1,224

+451

+58%

As you can see, we have an almost 58% increase in the rate of full projects created on Drupal.org. We can also see a significant proportional increase in two key areas: projects with greater than 50 site usage and no security coverage(up 150% compared to the previous period), and projects that have applied for security coverage(up 344% compared to the previous period). Note: this increase in applications is for projects *created in these date ranges* not necessarily applications created overall.

This tells us that reducing friction in applying for security coverage, and encouraging project maintainers to do so should be a top priority.

Finally, this last table gives statistics about all of the projects currently on Drupal.org, regardless of creation date:

Full projects (7.x and 8.x)

#

% of Total

Rate of change after 2017-03-17

… with the ability to opt into security coverage

8,718

36.15%

-1.33%

… with security coverage and stable releases

8,377

34.74%

-1.49%

… without security coverage

15,396

63.85%

+1.33%

… without security coverage and with stable releases

464

1.92%

+1.04%

… with security coverage and >=50 usage
 

6,475

66.91 / 26.85%

-0.54%

… with security coverage and stable releases and >=50 usage

6,308

65.19 /26.16%

-0.65%

… without security coverage and >=50 usage

3,202

33.09 /13.28%

+0.54%

… without security coverage and with stable releases and >=50 usage

130

1.34 /0.54%

+0.51%

Sub-total with >=50 usage

9,677

40.13%

-1.72%

Total

24,114

From the overall data we see approximately what we might expect. The increase in growth of full projects on Drupal.org has lead to a modest increase in projects without security coverage.

Before the project application change, all full projects with stable releases received security advisory coverage. After this change, only those projects that apply for the ability to opt in(and then do so) receive coverage.

What has this meant for security coverage of projects hosted on Drupal.org?

1.92% of all full 7.x and 8.x projects have stable releases, but do not receive security advisory coverage. It is likely no accident that this translates into 464 projects, which is nearly equivalent to the number of projects additional projects added compared to our old growth rate.

Of those only 130 of those projects report more than 50 sites usage(or .54% of all 7.x and 8x full projects).

Next steps

From this analysis we can conclude the following:

  1. The opening of the project application gates has dramatically increased the number of projects contributed to Drupal.org.

  2. It has also increased the number of projects without security coverage, and the number of applications for the ability to opt in to coverage among new projects.

In consultation with the Security Working Group, we recommend the following:

  • For now, leave the project creation projects as it stands today - open to contribution from any confirmed user on Drupal.org.

    • Less than 2% of all Drupal projects with stable releases currently lack security coverage. The rate at which this is increasing is significant (and in the wrong direction) but not rapid enough to merit changing the project application policy immediately.

  • Solve the problem of too many security advisory coverage applications. The security advisory application queue has the same problem that the old project applications queue had - not enough volunteers to manually vet all of the applications - and therefore a significant backlog of project maintainers waiting on the ability to opt into coverage.

    • Recommendation: Implement an automated best practices quiz that maintainers can take in order to be granted the ability to opt into security advisory coverage. If this process is as successful as we hope, we may want to consider making this a gate on stable releases for full projects as well.

We look forward to working with the Security Working Group to implement this recommendation and continue to improve the contribution experience on Drupal.org, while preserving code quality and security.

Annertech: DrupalCon Vienna 2017 - a Retrospective

Fri, 10/06/2017 - 22:21
DrupalCon Vienna 2017 - a Retrospective

Last week the Annertech team headed to Vienna for a week of Drupal learning and sharing. With thirteen different tracks and various summits, there was a lot of great sessions to choose from. We were also privileged and honoured to have the opportunity to present five sessions ourselves, and of course, we once again played host to the Drupal Trivia Night.

Dries Buytaert: Hermès using Drupal

Fri, 10/06/2017 - 17:40

Since its founding in 1837, Hermès has defined luxury. Renowned as an iconic brand within the fashion industry, Hermès is now setting the trend for how customers shop online. This week, Hermès launched its new site in Drupal!

Hermès married the abilities of Drupal as a CMS and Magento as an eCommerce engine to provide their customers with highly engaging shopping experience. Hermès' new site is a great example of how iconic brands can use Drupal to power ambitious digital experiences. If you are in the mood for some retail therapy, check out https://www.hermes.com!

Acquia Developer Center Blog: Continuous Integration Testing with Acquia Cloud CD

Fri, 10/06/2017 - 16:03

In my role as a Solutions Architect at Acquia, it’s exciting for me to be working with a growing number of customers who are moving from agile development processes to Continuous Integration (CI) and even Continuous Delivery (CD) processes.

Acquia Cloud CD provides the platform to enable this migration, however customers often ask us for best practices on their journey to a fully automated Continuous Delivery/Deployment model.

Tags: acquia drupal planet

Valuebound: An overview of JSON API: A text-based data exchange format

Fri, 10/06/2017 - 11:35

People develop APIs for a variety of reasons, such as to create a tool to facilitate internal processes or an external product for customers or to build a third party tool. And for such purpose JSON comes to the rescue. The open standard format JSON follows shared conventions that help in increasing productivity, take advantage of generalized tooling, and focus on the web applications. 

If you are a developer you must have noticed that there is very little information on the web regarding JSON API when compared to its usability. In this blog post, I will share an overview of JSON API. Let's try and understand what is JSON API? Its advantages over…

Valuebound: An overview of JSON API: A text-based data exchange format

Fri, 10/06/2017 - 11:35

People develop APIs for a variety of reasons, such as to create a tool to facilitate internal processes or an external product for customers or to build a third party tool. And for such purpose JSON comes to the rescue. The open standard format JSON follows shared conventions that help in increasing productivity, take advantage of generalized tooling, and focus on the web applications. 

If you are a developer you must have noticed that there is very little information on the web regarding JSON API when compared to its usability. In this blog post, I will share an overview of JSON API. Let's try and understand what is JSON API? Its advantages over…

ADCI Solutions: At DrupalCon 6204 sandwiches were eaten. What else should you know?

Fri, 10/06/2017 - 05:12

A week has passed since the end of DrupalCon Vienna. It was a huge milestone for our team and we're happy to keep up with the speed of Drupal evolution.

 

Missed the event? Here are some outputs.

 

Valuebound: How to Handle Resource Intensive Tasks on Queue With Drupal Queue Worker/API

Fri, 10/06/2017 - 03:34

It's never too late to share something useful with mates. And in this blog, I am going to discuss Queue Worker/API and how to implement it in Drupal 8. After completing this blog cum tutorial you will find yourself at a moderate level of expertise in implementing Queue API.

A couple of months back, we had a situation in one of our project where we had to pull data from a centralized server and update that content to the site almost every day. In order to overcome this scenario, we started using cron, but faced a situation where we were missing few contents because of time out. After a little research and discussion, we (our team) decided to implement queue worker. And yes! It worked.

Let’s start with Queue API.

Queue API enables us to handle a…

Nextide Blog: Untapped areas for Business Improvements

Fri, 10/06/2017 - 00:24

Many organization still struggle with the strain of manual processes that touch critical areas of the business. And these manual processes could be costlier that you think. It’s not just profit that may be slipping away but employee moral, innovation, competitiveness and so much more.

By automating routine tasks you can increase workflow efficiency, which in turn can free up staff for higher value work, driving down costs and boosting revenue. And it may be easier to achieve productivity gains simpler, faster, and with less risk that you may assume.

Most companies with manual work processes have been refining them for years, yet they may still not be efficient because they are not automated. So the question to ask is, “can I automate my current processes?”.

Lullabot: Web Accessibility with Marcy Sutton

Thu, 10/05/2017 - 18:00
Mike and Matt are joined by renowned web accessibility expert Marcy Sutton, along with Lullabot's own Helena McCabe to explore various web accessibility topics.