Planet Drupal

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Mediacurrent: Diversity at Mediacurrent: A Path Forward

Wed, 11/29/2017 - 15:53

The issue of workforce diversity has been in the news a lot lately, and rightfully so. Diversity data is pretty dismal, particularly in the technology industry. Essentially, there is a long history of white males disproportionately holding leadership roles and minorities being immensely underrepresented. You already knew that though.

Colorfield: Drupal 8, React, Vue, JSON API and ES6 learning resources

Wed, 11/29/2017 - 10:24
Drupal 8, React, Vue, JSON API and ES6 learning resources christophe Wed, 29/11/2017 - 10:24

Start by Contenta or Reservoir and if you are still hungry, here are some clues.

Tag1 Consulting: Background Image - A New Drupal 8 Module

Wed, 11/29/2017 - 02:00
Introducing a new, easy to use, Drupal 8 module for background images: If your site is designed around utilizing background images, then this module is for you! Whether you need a surgical implementation that only administrators/developers can implement or provide the ability to allow users to attach their own background images to entities, this module has you covered.Read more markcarver Tue, 11/28/2017 - 17:00 Blog: AGILEDROP: Drupal meetup with two great sessions

Wed, 11/29/2017 - 01:51
In the middle of November, we organized a Drupal meetup. Meetup is a great way to connect web developers, designers, and other web enthusiasts. We were hosting two lecturers, David Ličen from Slovenia and Philipp Melab from Austria. In this blog post, you can learn, what they shared with us.   David Ličen, Slovenia: “Drupal point of Vue” The Drupal point of Vue session, led by David Ličen, was a very good introduction to the decoupled Drupal, where the web application and server are separated. Session attendees were acquainted with the basics of a very simple yet powerful JavaScript… READ MORE

PreviousNext: Workflows: A new tool in the toolbox

Wed, 11/29/2017 - 00:26

At DrupalSouth 2017, I presented a session on the new Workflows module, which just went stable in Drupal 8.4.0. Workflows was split out from content moderation as a separate module, and can be used independently to create custom workflows. In this presentation, I gave a demonstration of how to create a basic workflow for an issue tracker.

by Kim Pepper / 29 November 2017

Since 2011 we have had access to a content moderation tool in Drupal 7 in the form of Workbench Moderation. This module introduced the concept of Draft ➡ Review ➡ Published workflows, with different user roles having specific permissions to move from one state to the next.

Unfortunately, the underlying Drupal core revision API was not designed to deal with this, and there were some pretty crazy workarounds.

Content moderation has long been a key feature request for Drupal, and so effort was made to port Workbench Moderation across to Drupal 8. 

Content Moderation drove a lot of cleanup in Drupal core APIs, including proper support for forward revisions, and adding revision support to other content entities besides Content Types, such as Custom Blocks. More are on the way.

In Drupal 8.3, the Workflows module was split out of Content Moderation. Why you may ask? Well, because the Workflows module provides the state machine engine that Content Moderation relies on.

What is a State Machine?

A state machine defines a set of states and rules on how you can transition between those states.

A door state machine

In our simple example of a door, it can only be opened, closed or locked. However, you can't go directly from locked to open, you need to unlock it first.

Content Moderation Workflow Configuration

Content Moderation provides a set of Workflow states and transitions by default.

Content Moderation StatesContent Moderation Transitions

If we were to put this together in a state machine diagram, it would look like the following:

Content Moderation State Machine

From the above diagram, it becomes clear what the allowed transitions are between states.

So now Workflows has been configured with our Content Moderation states and transitions, what is left for Content Moderation to do?

What Does Content Moderation Do?

It turns out quite a lot. Remember, that Workflows only provides the state machine. It in no way prescribes how you should manage the current state of a particular entity.

Content Moderation provides:

  • Default Workflows configuration
  • A fairly complex WorkflowType plugin which works with the Revision API.
  • Storage for individual states on content entities
  • Configuration of which entity bundles (Content types, etc.) should have Content Moderation
  • A number of admin forms for configuring the workflows and how they apply
  • Permissions
Building an Issue Tracker

We want to build a very simple issue tracker for our example. The state machine diagram is the following:

Issue Tracker State Machine

That's the simple bits out of the way. Now, in order to build an issue tracker, we will need to replicate the rest what Content Moderation does!

Fortunately there is a module that can do most of the heavy lifting for us.

Workflows Field

“This module provides a field which allows you to store states on any content entity and ensure the states change according to transitions defined by the core workflows module.” 

Perfect! Let's download and install it.

Next we want to add a new Workflow. We can assign it a label of Issue Status and you'll see that we have a new Workflows Field option in the Workflow Type dropdown.

Add new workflow

We can then configure the desire Workflows states and transitions.

Issue StatesIssue Transitions

Thats the our Workflows configured. Now we need to create a new Issue content type to attach our workflow to. It's assumed you know how to create a content type already. If not, check out the User Guide.

Next, we need to add our Workflows Field to our Issue content type. Follow the usual steps to add a field, and in the drop down choose Workflows as the field type, and our previously created Issue Status workflow.

Add workflows fieldTest it out!

Now we can test our our workflow by creating a new Issue from the Content page. If everything was configured correctly, we should see a new field on the edit form for Status.

Issue status form

Given the transitions we defined in our workflow, we should only be allowed to see certain values in the drop-down, depending on the current state.

Testing workflow constraintsWhat next?

That's it for setting up and configuring a custom workflow using Workflows Field. Some next steps would be:

  • Add permissions for certain users (there's an issue for that #2904573 )
  • Add email notifications
How would you use the new Workflows API?

Let me know in the comments!

Tagged Workflows, Content Moderation

Posted by Kim Pepper
Technical Director

Dated 29 November 2017

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DrupalCon News: Calling all Drupalers!

Tue, 11/28/2017 - 21:36

We want to hear your voice at DrupalCon. 

Acro Media: Video: Recurring Billing, Now Baked Right In to Drupal Commerce 2

Tue, 11/28/2017 - 20:06

If you ever have need of timed or delayed payments, we have some good news: recurring billing (also known as subscriptions) is new and improved in Commerce 2. Check out this week's High5 episode and learn more!

What is recurring billing?

It's anything where we want to have a transaction happen after the initial time when a customer is on our site. That might be monthly or yearly, or it might be when you want the last half of the payment to go through in a couple days or a week.

How does it work?

It's not like we store pictures of everyone's credit cards and just keep applying charges to them. Instead, we store tokens, or references to the credit cards. This is much safer because it means that even if the site got hacked, no one would have access to your actual banking information. At no point does Commerce ever store your actual credit card.

If you're interested in reading more about tokenization, Wikipedia has a lot of good information on the subject. 

How is this different from Commerce 1?

We sort of had tokenization (a.k.a card on file) in Commerce 1. It was a contrib module and wasn't actually part of Commerce itself. Some payment gateways supported it, some didn't, some did but only partially… it was much more of an ad hoc thing.

Now, tokenization is built into Commerce, so any major payment gateway that gets set up and has the capacity to store tokens (which is most of them), will do so. You don't need to do anything special for your payment gateway to handle recurring billings. As long as we have that token, we can keep making charges to it until that token becomes invalid (i.e. the card gets cancelled).

It was actually a credit to Commerce 1 that it had tokenization at all. It's a complex thing. For instance, if a payment doesn't go through, do we have to cancel the subscription? Do we have to get the product back? Do we do that immediately, or give them a window of time to put in the new card? A lot of ecommerce setups just avoided that entirely, so it was definitely a strength of Commerce 1, and now it's really a strength of Commerce 2.

The bottom line

Recurring billing rocks, and is now built right into Commerce 2.